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Depending on their state of health, the mitochondria will affect the future outcome of cells and tissues. They are viewed as energy factories that enable cells to carry out their vital biological functions. They therefore dynamically adapt their size, shape and distribution within the cell. These organelles result from the equilibrium between the opposing processes of mitochondrial fission and fusion.

To study these mechanisms, very rarely described in dermo-cosmetic research, SILAB has established a research program in partnership with a CNRS research team (UMR 5239) from the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon in France. These 4 years of work have resulted in the development of models able to understand the mitochondrial dynamic in vitro and its consequences on cell behavior. Although there was no available tool for quantifying this mitochondrial dynamic automatically, SILAB has specifically developed MITOSHAPE®, an innovative tool making it possible to quantify the state of the mitochondrial system in living cells automatically, rapidly, accurately and reproducibly.

This research work has been reported in a scientific publication in the journal Scientific Reports, produced by the publishers of the journal Nature:
Romain Jugé, Josselin Breugnot, Célia Da Silva, Sylvie Bordes, Brigitte Closs & Abdel Aouacheria, Quantification and Characterization of UVB-Induced Mitochondrial Fragmentation in Normal Primary Human Keratinocytes. Sci Rep. 2016 Oct 12; 6: 35065.

MITOSHAPE® technology was used as part of the development of ALGOPHAGYL®, an energizing active ingredient from the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana, and inspired by the metabolic and adaptogenic properties of this cellular organism. Whatever the stress level, ALGOPHAGYL® acts on the mitochondrion to ensure its protection enabling it to adapt to its environment and boosting its metabolism. When healthy, the mitochondria contribute to effective renewal of the cutaneous barrier to provide a hydrated and radiant skin.

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep35065